Photographing Textiles Workshop

In February, Derek Hannaford led a workshop on Photographing Textiles. We looked at equipment (camera, tripod, reflectors/diffusers, light-boxes, and props) and camera settings (focus, exposure, white balance/colour temperature and lighting/flash). Then we worked on the actual photography for different purposes and finally making use of your photos (understanding pixels and pixel counts, using graphics programs to edit the shots and publishing or printing.)

Many of us discovered the "hidden" features of even the simpler cameras, and everyone who joined in found ways to make huge improvements in their work with the minimum of extra equipment.

Right: Derek's setup with background and reflector

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Juliana Gehry from Alsace, experimented with different backgrounds for her framed gold embroidery.

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Jenni Young from the Scottish Borders worked with lighting and camera settings to get a sharp closeup of this small twill sample against a neutral grey background.

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Jillian Dexter from Hexham, Northumberland, produced a selection of shots of this scarf to to try and bring out the detail and colours.

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This image shows version 1 and 4 of a series of photos from Annie Perkins. The first shot is from the start of the workshop and the second is the best of the sequence of shots taken using changes to lighting, camera settings and post processing.

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Christina Chisholm from Ross-shire, Scotland, took an initial photo of some yarn skeins with her camera on full automatic. They are on the left. More photos were taken with different lighting and a variety of white balance settings. The photo on the right shows the colours of the skeins much more accurately.

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These last 2 shots show Maria Bennett from Cardiff tackling a subject very close to heart of all spinners, the production of a good detailed photogragh of a skein of white handspun yarn. The photographs show, on the left the skein with additional lighting from a reflector, and on the right, the same shot without a reflector. In this case, removing some of the shadows has reduced the contrast.